JAMA recientes

JAMA recientes 2017-01-13T09:39:10+00:00

Project Description

JAMA - recientes

Highlights for May 22/29, 2018
22/5/2018
ver resumen

The Opioid Epidemic: What to Do?
22/5/2018
Peltz G, Südhof TC.
ver resumen
This Viewpoint uses the observation that ondansetron has been found to reduce symptoms of opioid withdrawal to argue for research and public health programs aimed at preventing rather than just managing opioid addiction.

The Physician’s Role in Increasing Naloxone Awareness and Use
22/5/2018
Adams JM.
ver resumen
In this Viewpoint, US Surgeon General Jerome Adams summarizes his office’s 2018 Advisory on Naloxone and Opioid Overdose, which provides guidance on the use of naloxone to curb the number of opioid overdose deaths across the country.

Approaches to Help Patients Past Failures in Health Change Monitoring
22/5/2018
Kangovi S, Asch DA.
ver resumen
This Viewpoint discusses how workplace lifestyle and health monitoring interventions can discourage and disengage employees when health measures fail to show positive change, and proposes that organizations develop coaching and psychological strategies to motivate employees who grow discouraged from an absence of clear change through their sense of failure.

Better Health Care Quality Assessment Through Risk Adjustment Method Ranking
22/5/2018
Braithwaite R.
ver resumen
This Viewpoint proposes a system for ranking the quality of risk adjustment methods as a way to more accurately account for health care quality and more transparently link payment incentives to performance and patient outcomes.

A Physician’s Awakening to Patient Challenges When Facing His Own Illness
22/5/2018
Garnick MB.
ver resumen
In this narrative medicine essay, a medical oncologist shares how little he understood of his patients’ pain and challenges while undergoing cancer treatment until his own diagnosis, which inspired working with administrators to help patients navigate the institutional labyrinth and provide transportation to and from treatment.

Prenatal vs Infant Vitamin D Supplementation and the Risk of Wheezing in Childhood
22/5/2018
Greer FR.
ver resumen
The benefits of vitamin D supplementation are an area of intense scientific and clinical interest. Although the association of vitamin D with respiratory disease has been observed for more than 100 years, the potential benefits of vitamin D for the prevention of respiratory tract disease, including wheezing disorders, continue to be investigated in many observational and epidemiologic studies. However, a 2011 Institute of Medicine report concluded that the available evidence was insufficient to establish a functional relationship between vitamin D and any health outcome other than the maintenance of bone health across the lifespan, including prevention and treatment of infantile vitamin D deficiency rickets.

Annual Surveillance for Resected Colorectal Cancer
22/5/2018
Sanoff HK.
ver resumen
Colorectal cancer is unique in solid tumor oncology because surgical resection for patients with solitary or oligometastatic disease can provide long-term disease-free survival, and even cure. Largely predicated on the notion that earlier recurrence detection will allow a greater chance of surgery with curative intent, specialty guidelines recommend that patients with stage II or III colorectal cancers should be followed up with a 5-year surveillance program of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) testing, computed tomography (CT) scans, and endoscopy. These guidelines are supported by multiple prior studies on the role and schedule of surveillance, which suggest surveillance increases curative intent surgical resections and improves overall survival.

Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Recurrent Wheezing in Preterm Black Infants
22/5/2018
Hibbs A, Ross K, Kerns L, et al.
ver resumen
This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of 2 vitamin D dosing strategies on recurrent wheezing in black infants at 12months of age who were born preterm.

Effect of More vs Less Frequent Follow-up Testing on Overall and Cancer-Specific Mortality
22/5/2018
Wille-Jørgensen P, Syk I, Smedh K, et al.
ver resumen
This randomized controlled trial compares the effects of high- vs low-frequency computed tomographic and carcinoembryonic antigen surveillance on 5-year overall mortality and colorectal cancer–specific mortality rates among patients with stage II and II colorectal cancer after curative resection.

Posttreatment Colorectal Cancer Surveillance Testing Intensity and Disease Recurrence
22/5/2018
Snyder RA, Hu C, Cuddy A, et al.
ver resumen
This cohort study uses medical record data to compare disease recurrence among patients with stages I, II, or III colorectal cancer monitored with higher- vs lower-intensity imaging and CEA surveillance testing within 3 years after treatment.

Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion and Stroke and Mortality Among Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery
22/5/2018
Yao X, Gersh BJ, Holmes DR, Jr, et al.
ver resumen
This cohort study uses administrative data from a large US database to evaluate whether surgical occlusion of the left atrial appendage (LAAO) during CABG or valve surgery is associated with risk of stroke, mortality, and atrial fibrillation.

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in 2018
22/5/2018
Bhatt DL.
ver resumen
This JAMA Clinical Update reviews the evolution of procedures for treating coronary artery stenosis since 1977 and the role of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the management of acute coronary syndromes (NSTEMI and STEMI), stable and unstable angina, and stable multivessel disease.

A Young Woman With Cough and Lithoptysis
22/5/2018
de Lima A, Barry M, Majid A.
ver resumen
A 28-year-old healthy woman had a 2-week history of dyspnea, cough, wheezing, and lithoptysis. She had a borderline elevated Histoplasma antigen level, and a chest computed tomography scan revealed a calcified subcarinal mass compromising the left main-stem bronchus lumen. What would you do next?

Research Funding Sources in Evidence Reviews Informing USPSTF Recommendations
22/5/2018
Villani J, Ngo-Metzger Q, Vincent IS, et al.
ver resumen
This study characterizes the sources of funding for the research included in systematic reviews that form the basis for US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statements.

Air Pollution and Mortality in the Medicare Population
22/5/2018
Lipfert FW.
ver resumen
To the Editor Mr Di and colleagues found that short-term exposures to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone were associated with increased mortality in older adults using statistical analyses of a large database. However, they used incomplete exposure data and an inappropriate outcome measure, and they neglected regional variability.

Air Pollution and Mortality in the Medicare Population
22/5/2018
Cox L, Jr.
ver resumen
To the Editor In a case-crossover study, the authors noted that “In the US Medicare population from 2000 to 2012, short-term exposures to PM2.5 and warm-season ozone were significantly associated with increased risk of mortality. This risk occurred at levels below current national air quality standards, suggesting that these standards may need to be reevaluated.” Such studies of association fail to address the key causal question: How would public health effects change if exposure concentrations were reduced? Instead, they addressed an easier, noncausal question: What are the estimated ratios (or slope factors or regression coefficients) of health effects to past pollution levels in selected models and data sets? Answers to the second question are inadequate substitutes for answers to the first question for several reasons.

Air Pollution and Mortality in the Medicare Population
22/5/2018
Young S.
ver resumen
To the Editor There are many aspects of the study by Mr Di and colleagues that call into question their finding that air quality was associated with increased deaths: size of the effects, modeling bias, and flexibility of analysis. These methodological aspects are especially concerning given that recent large studies found no association between air quality and mortality.

Air Pollution and Mortality in the Medicare Population—Reply
22/5/2018
Schwartz JD.
ver resumen
In Reply Dr Lipfert criticizes our study for not including indoor-generated particles in our exposure. Indoor particles are a potential confounder, not an omitted part of outdoor particles. Differences in indoor exposure across persons cannot confound the results of our case-crossover study; the exposure contrast was within person, between case and control days. To confound, daily variation in particles from cooking, smoking, etc, must be correlated with daily variation in outdoor PM2.5 of the same person. The Medicare Beneficiary Survey showed that 86% of beneficiaries were nonsmokers. It seems implausible that smokers consistently smoked more or that people fried more food on higher pollution days.

Surgical Procedures for Patients With Severe Obesity
22/5/2018
Cohn T, Pryor A, Spaniolas K.
ver resumen
To the Editor The Editorial by Drs Arterburn and Gupta summarized the results of 2 randomized clinical trials comparing sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Based on the 5-year results of these trials, the authors concluded that the procedures “are overall quite similar in terms of their effects on weight and comorbid conditions,” with a 1-unit difference in body mass index (BMI) between them at 5 years. We have a few concerns about this conclusion.







Feed aggregation powered by Syndicate Press.
Processed request in 1.29808 seconds.

Deje su comentario

Uso de cookies

Este sitio web utiliza cookies para conseguir la mejor experiencia de usuario. Si continúa navegando está dando su consentimiento para la aceptación de las mencionadas cookies y la aceptación de nuestra política de cookies ACEPTAR

Aviso de cookies

Envía un mensaje

Desde aquí puedes contactar con riesgovascular.org para enviarnos tus comentarios, sugerencias o cualquier otro tema que consideres oportuno

Intentaremos contestar lo antes posible.